Wikipedia: Geolocated Wikipedia articles, downloaded 2015-08 near 41 FREMONT RD, EPPING, NH 03042 Latitude 43.0325 Longitude -71.09385 -- GeoQuery GeoQuery: Wikipedia: Geolocated Wikipedia articles, downloaded 2015-08 near 41 FREMONT RD, EPPING, NH 03042 Latitude 43.0325 Longitude -71.09385

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 Watson Academy is a historic school building on Academy Street in Epping, New Hampshire, United States. This 2-1- 2 story wood frame structure was built in 1883, and is the only known Queen Anne style school building in southern New Hampshire. It was designed by Dover architect Charles E. Joy, who moved to St. Paul, Minnesota in 1884. The building is basically rectangular in form, with symmetrical single-story wings extending the front facade. It has a variety of gables and window sizes and shap...
 
 
The Fremont Meeting House (also known as Poplin Meeting House) is a historic meeting house at 464 Main Street (New Hampshire Route 107) in Fremont, New Hampshire. It is a large wooden clapboarded structure, measuring 466 by 368, which was built in 1800, when Fremont was called Poplin. It has retained its twin porches for accessing the upper gallery, a feature that is not found in most surviving meeting houses. Its interior still has some of the original box pews, and the gallery choir space has ...
 
Stations along Boston and Maine Railroad lines, Former railway stations in the United States, Railway stations on the National Register of Historic Places in New Hampshire, Railway stations opened in 1893, Railroad museums in New Hampshire, Buildings and structures in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, Museums in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, History museums in New Hampshire, New Hampshire Registered Historic Place stubs, Northeastern United States railway station stubs, New Hampshire buildin...
Pawtuckaway Lake is a 784-acre (3.17 km2) water body located in Rockingham County in southeastern New Hampshire, United States, in the town of Nottingham. The official name of the lake is Pawtuckaway Pond. The original, natural pond was enlarged in the 19th century by the construction of four dams. Three of the dams, near the southern end of the lake, feed the Pawtuckaway River, which flows southeast to the Lamprey River in the western part of the town of Epping. The fourth dam, located at the n...
  
 
School buildings on the National Register of Historic Places in New Hampshire, School buildings completed in 1850, Buildings and structures in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, Defunct schools in New Hampshire, Museums in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, Education museums in the United States, History museums in New Hampshire, New Hampshire Registered Historic Place stubs, Northeastern United States museum stubs, New Hampshire building and structure stubs, New Hampshire school stubs, Hidden cat...
  
 
  
 The Dame School is a historic meeting house, school, and now local historical museum, on New Hampshire Route 152 in Nottingham, New Hampshire. The single story wood-frame Greek Revival structure was built in 1840 as a church; according to local legend, timbers from a 1740 church were used in its construction. Its main facade has a simple entrance topped by a transom window, and flanked by a pair of windows. The building is topped by a three-stage tower, whose second stage houses a belfry, and wh...

Records 21+:
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The John Elkins Farmstead is a historic farmstead at 155 Beach Plain Road in Danville, New Hampshire, United States. It consists of a main house, with a wing that connects it to a barn; a carriage shed frames the west side of the courtyard formed by these structures, which lie just north of Beach Plain Road. The construction date of the farmhouse is not known from documentary sources; architectural evidence suggests it was built in the late 18th century, probably for Jeremiah Elkins, who had rec...
The Danville Meetinghouse (also known as The Hawke Meetinghouse) is a historic colonial meeting house on N. Main Street in Danville, New Hampshire. Built c. 1760, it is one of the oldest and least-altered meeting houses in New Hampshire. The 2-1- 2 story wood frame structure was built by local residents as the meeting for the east parish of Kingston, before it was separately incorporated, first as Hawke, then as Danville. Many of its windows were enlarged slightly c. 1800, and the building also ...
  
The Josiah Bartlett House is a house in Kingston, New Hampshire. The 2-1- 2 story wood frame house is located on Main Street, opposite Town Hall. The main block of the house, five bays wide and three deep, was built in 1774 by Josiah Bartlett, replacing a house which was destroyed by fire. During the first decades of the 19th century, Greek Revival styling was added to the house, as was a two-story addition to the rear. The Greek Revival elements include large corner pilasters, projecting lintel...
The Nichols Memorial Library is a historic library building on Main Street in Kingston, New Hampshire, United States. The building is a single-story irregular stone structure with a red slate roof. It was designed by Dwight and Chandler of Boston and completed in 1898. It was built as a gift to the town by Kingston native J. Howard Nichols, a Boston industrialist and philanthropist. The building is distinctive statewide as the only local library building exhibiting Shingle style and Richardsonia...
  
 
The First Universalist Church is a historic church on Main Street in Kingston, New Hampshire. It is a wood frame structure which was designed by architects Damon Brothers and built in 1879. It is rectangular in shape with a gable roof and a four-stage square tower projecting out of its northwest corner. The first stage of the tower has paired stencilled rectangular windows, and the second has single four-leaf-clover windows. The third stage is louvered on all four sides, and houses the church be...
The Edward Sewall Garrison is a historic house at 16 Epping Road in Exeter, New Hampshire. The oldest portion of this house, the northern portion of its main block, is a (formerly) fortified garrison house built in 1676. This section retains evidence of this early history in its walls, which contain evidence of brick infill and small windows typical of the period. The southern portion of the main block was added c. 1730-1751, and includes its original chimney. Additions were added to the rear in...
Towns in Strafford County, New Hampshire, Populated places established in 1766, Towns in New Hampshire, Hidden categories:, Coordinates on Wikidata, Articles needing additional references from April 2012, All articles needing additional references, All articles with unsourced statements, Articles with unsourced statements from September 2014, Articles with unsourced statements from December 2013, Articles with unsourced statements from May 2008, Commons category template with no category set, Co...
  
 Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS) is a nonprofit virtual charter school in Exeter, New Hampshire, the only public online high school in the state. It offers full-time and part-time admissions. The school was founded in 2007 by Steve Kossakoski, who holds a doctorate in education administration from University of New Hampshire. VLACS is licensed by the New Hampshire Board of Education, making it free to students under 21 living in the state. Students living in other states, however,...
The Moses-Kent House is a historic house at 1 Pine Street in Exeter, New Hampshire. The 2-1- 2 story wood frame house was built in 1868 by Henry Clay Moses, a local wool merchant. It underwent significant alterations c. 1901-02 after it was purchased by George Kent, owner of the Exeter Manufacturing Company. It is predominantly Second Empire in its styling, with strong Italianate influence. Its most prominent feature is a three-story tower with mansard roof and windows whose molded surrounds mat...

Records 41+:
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The Ladd-Gilman House, also known as Cincinnati Memorial Hall, is a historic house at 1 Governors Lane in Exeter, New Hampshire, United States. The home was built about 1721 by Nathaniel Ladd as one of the states first brick houses, and was subsequently clapboarded three decades later. The home was purchased in 1747 by Daniel Gilman, a prominent Exeter merchant. It served as the state treasury during the American Revolutionary War when two members of the Gilman family, Col. Nicholas Gilman and h...
The American Independence Museum is a historic house museum located in Exeter, New Hampshire. Its 1-acre (0.40 ha) campus includes two buildings: the Ladd-Gilman House, a registered National Historic Landmark built in 1721 by Nathaniel Ladd, and the Folsom Tavern, built in 1775 by Colonel Samuel Folsom. The museum was opened in 1991 after a rare copy of the Declaration of Independence known as a Dunlap Broadside was found in the Ladd-Gilman house, 200 years after its arrival in Exeter. It is the...
 
Former state capitals in the United States, Towns in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, Exeter, New Hampshire, Towns in New Hampshire, Hidden categories:, Coordinates on Wikidata, Articles needing additional references from April 2012, All articles needing additional references, All articles with unsourced statements, Articles with unsourced statements from July 2010, Commons category template with no category set, Commons category with page title same as on Wikidata, Wikipedia articles with VIAF...
First Church, also known as Congregational Church or United Church of Christ, is a historic church building at 21 Front Street in Exeter, New Hampshire. The two-story wood frame structure was built in 1798, and was the fifth meeting house built by the congregation, which was established in 1639 by Exeter founder John Wheelwright. It was designed by Ebenezer Clifford, a local builder, and has a number of distinctive features. Its hip roof is believed to be the earliest such roof built on a church...
The Wiswall Falls Mill Site (site 27-ST-38) is a historic archaeological industrial site in Durham, New Hampshire. It is located in John Hatch Park, a small public park just south of Wiswall Road on the eastern bank of the Lamprey River. The 3-acre (1.2 ha) site encompasses the remains of a small 19th-century mill complex. Included in this site are the foundational remnants of a sawmill, paper mill, dam, power canal, and a variety of ancillary structures. Significant industrial activity began he...
The Sandown Old Meetinghouse is a historic meeting house on Fremont Road in Sandown, New Hampshire. Built in 1773, this single-story wood frame structure is a virtually unaltered late-Colonial civic and religious structure. It is believed to be unique in the state for its level of preservation, both internal and external. Even though religious services ended in the building in 1834, it has retained its 18th-century pulpit and sounding board, as well as its original box pews. The building was use...
The Stone School is a historic school building on Granite Street in Newmarket, New Hampshire. Built in 1841-42, it is a mainly granite structure, three stories on one side and two on the other, as it is built into the side of a hill. The walls are of rubble construction, with some shale mixed in with the granite. The stone was quarried at Durham Point. It was used continuously as a school until 1966, when it was given to the Newmarket Historical Society, which now operates it as the Stone School...
The Sandown Depot is a former railroad station of the Boston and Maine Railroad in Sandown, New Hampshire. This wood-frame building was built in 1873-74 by the Nashua and Rochester Railroad, which was eventually absorbed by the Boston and Maine. It is the best-preserved of the Nashua and Rochesters stations to survive, remaining relatively unaltered since its construction, and still at its original location. The station was a major location on a heavily-traveled single track, with support servic...

Records 61+:
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The Deacon Samuel and Jabez Lane Homestead is a historic farmstead on Portsmouth Avenue in Stratham, New Hampshire. It occupies a roughly triangular island of land bounded by the junction of New Hampshire Routes 33 and 108, which functions as a rotary. The main house is a 2-1- 2 story Federal style structure built in 1807; the property also includes a corn crib dating to the same period, a shoe shop dating to c. 1740, and a mid-19th century barn. The house is notable for the joinery (particularl...
The Barlett-Cushman House is a historic house at 82 Portsmouth Road (New Hampshire Route 33) in Stratham, New Hampshire. The five-wide and three-deep 2-1- 2 story wood frame house was built c. 1810. It is an example of a Federal-style double house, with its principal entrance framed by sidelight windows and pilasters, with a fanlight window and entablature above. Secondary entrances are simpler, with four-light transom windows topped by a bracketed cornice. The southern half of the house has a p...
The Spruce Hole Bog, locally known as Spruce Hole, is a complete ecological community occupying a true kettle hole in the town of Durham, New Hampshire. According to the National Register of Natural Landmarks: It illustrates characteristics of a typical sphagnum-heath bog, localized in a specialized geologic setting. It was designated a National Natural Landmark in 1972. Spruce Hole is located two miles west of the town center of Durham, and is owned by the town. It is reached by a woods road of...
The Greeley House is a historic First Period house on New Hampshire Route 108, east of the center of East Kingston, New Hampshire. It is located prominently on a bend in the road, just a few feet from the roadway. The 2-1- 2 story wood frame house was probably built in 1718, with the rear shed addition added later in the 18th century. Further additions including a gable dormer atop the rear section, and a 1960s-era shed-roof addition on the east side. The house is five bays wide (with only three...
The North School, also known locally as the Brick School, is a historic one-room schoolhouse at 63 Amesbury Street in Kensington, New Hampshire. Built in 1842, it was the only brick schoolhouse built in the town, and is one of its four surviving 19th-century schools. Of those, it is the best-preserved, and is used as a local history museum. It served the towns educational purposes between 1842 and 1956. It has seen primarily modest alterations since its construction, most notably the addition of...
Chester Congregational Church is a historic church at 4 Chester Street (New Hampshire Route 121) in Chester, New Hampshire. This wood frame building was originally built as a traditional New England colonial meeting house in 1773, and underwent significant alteration in 1840, giving it its present Greek Revival appearance. Most of its interior was lost during these alterations, but the original roof trusses are still in evidence. The front facade of the church resembles a temple front, with wide...
 
Stevens Memorial Hall is the town hall of Chester, New Hampshire. The building, a large wood frame structure completed in 1910, is located in the center of Chester at the junction of New Hampshire Routes 121 and 102. Designed by Lawrence, Massachusetts, architect George G. Adams, it is basically vernacular Colonial Revival in style. The building houses town offices, and has at times also housed the public library. Its upper floor consists of a large auditorium space used for civic and social fun...
The Lamprey River is a 50.2-mile-long (80.8 km) river in southeastern New Hampshire, the United States. It rises in Meadow Lake in Northwood, and flows south, then generally east past Raymond, Epping, Lee, Durham and finally Newmarket. Here, it meets Great Bay, a tidal inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, to which it is connected by a tidal estuary, the Piscataqua River. The river from the Bunker Pond Dam in Epping to the confluence with the Piscassic River is part of the designated National Wild and Sc...

Records 81+:
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The Cornet Thomas Wiggin House is a historic house at 249 Portsmouth Avenue (New Hampshire Route 33) in Stratham, New Hampshire. The 2-1- 2 story wood frame house was built c. 1775, although it was apparently not completed until the 1790s, after the death of Thomas Wiggin and the resolution of legal disputes concerning his estate. The interior is thought to have been finished by Nathan Barker, Wiggins son-in-law and eventual purchaser of the property. The house is a well-preserved example of ver...
 The Yankee Clipper Council was a council of the Boy Scouts of America serving 52 communities in northeastern Massachusetts and southeastern New Hampshire. The council was formed from a merger of the North Essex Council, North Bay Council, and Lone Tree Council in 1993. Greater Lowell Council merged with Yankee Clipper in 2000. Greater Lowell Council chose to merge with Yankee Clipper over three adjacent councils. Greater Lowell District formed the fifth spoke on the ships wheel totem of the YCC ...
The Kensington Town House is the town hall of Kensington, New Hampshire. Located at 95 Amesbury Road (New Hampshire Route 150), the single-story wood frame building was erected in 1846. Its interior meeting space features structural elements reused from an earlier meeting house, dating to c. 1770. The building was enlarged in the 1880s, and a two-story addition (its height obscured because of lower grade) was added in 1918, at which time the stage and proscenium were added to the main hall. The ...
The Union Meetinghouse or Universalist Church is a historic church building at 97 Amesbury Road in Kensington, New Hampshire. The single story Greek Revival white clapboard structure was built in 1839-40, and occupies a prominent site in the center of Kensington. Its main facade has a pedimented gable and a pair of doorways, each flanked by sidelight windows and topped by an entablature. The church tower has two stages, and is topped by Gothic pinnaces at the corners (a later addition). The buil...
The Deerfield Town House (or Deerfield Town Hall) is the town hall of Deerfield, New Hampshire. It is located on Church Street (formerly Old Centre Road), just west of its junction with New Hampshire Route 107. The 2-1- 2 story wood frame structure was built in 1856, and is one of the states finest examples of public Greek Revival architecture. Its corners have pilasters, and the gable end is fully pedimented, with a small oculus window. There are three doors on the main facade, each flanked by ...
Cowell Stadium is an 6,500-seat open-air multi-purpose stadium in Durham, New Hampshire on the campus of the University of New Hampshire. It is home to the University of New Hampshire Wildcats football and track and field teams. The stadium, which runs west-northwest, consists of a FieldTurf playing surface surrounded by a 400-metre track. On either side of the track are aluminum stands (the larger home stands being on northeast side), and temporary seating is placed in endzones during football ...
 
 
 
University of New Hampshire, Educational institutions established in 1866, Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities, Land-grant universities and colleges, University System of New Hampshire, Forestry education, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Buildings and structures in Manchester, New Hampshire, Universities and colleges in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Universities and colleges in Strafford County, New Hampshire, Flagship universities in the United States, 1866 ...The University of New Hampshire (UNH) is a public research university in the University System of New Hampshire (USNH), in the United States. The universitys Durham campus, comprising six colleges, is located in the Seacoast region of the state. A seventh college, the University of New Hampshire at Manchester, occupies the universitys campus in Manchester, the states largest urban center. The University of New Hampshire School of Law, known as the Franklin Pierce Law Center until 2010, is locate...
Thompson Hall, also commonly referred to locally as T-hall, is one of the central buildings on the campus of the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, United States. A large brick and stone building, it was designed by Concord architects Dow & Randlett and built in 1892. It was the first building to be built on the Durham campus, and was named for Benjamin Thompson, a farmer who left his entire Durham estate to the state for use as the college campus. The building was listed on t...

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Link to query each field of Wikipedia: Geolocated Wikipedia articles, downloaded 2015-08 near 41 FREMONT RD, EPPING, NH 03042 Value in the first recordsee also

Article Title, in Wikipedia

  Epping, New Hampshire  

URL, of the Wikipedia article

  Epping,_New_Hampshire  

Categories the item belongs to

  Towns in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, Towns in New Hampshire, Hidden categories:, Coordinates on Wikidata, Articles needing additional references from April 2012, All articles needing additional references,  

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  500px-Rockingham_Epping_NH.png  

P: First paragraph of the article

  Epping is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 6,411 at the 2010 census. Epping includes the area known as Camp Hedding.  

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